Trump’s 5G plans aren’t free markets

It leaked last week President Donald Trump’s administration was considering a couple plans on 5G, including nationalization. I wrote about it at Hot Air, pointing out the dangers of both. Here is an excerpt from the piece

It’s not necessarily nationalization, but it depends on the language of whatever contract the government gives to this mysterious “company outside of the traditional bidders.” It also depends on how “separate” the tech company is from the government itself. I reached out to Ryan Radia at Competitive Enterprise Institute on the issue, and he’s got more concerns about the government-funded centralization.

“It might actually be worse if the federal government co-develops the network with a private firm that is the putative owner/operator, as compared to an outright nationalized network,” Radia wrote in an email. “The resulting entity might well be exempt from laws governing federal agencies, such as FOIA, the Administrative Procedure Act, the Paperwork Reduction Act, and so forth. And the network operator’s liabilities would presumably be considered off the government’s books for purposes of calculating federal liabilities.”

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Source: Taylor Millard

Trump’s 5G plans aren’t free markets

Donald Trump is not a libertarian

My latest post at Hot Air looks at the ridiculous piece by Jonathan Chait at New York magazine suggesting the election of Donald Trump means the libertarian moment has “arrived.” Here is an snippet of the piece.

The preposterous allegation came as a bit of a jolt to yours truly, who has been a rather vocal critic of the President since his 2015 speech before a crowd in Arizona. It would be quite effortless to unleash a torrent of abuse and Viking berserker fury on Chait’s ridiculous notion alone. However, there are other libertarians who do a better job at using their “little grey cells,” to quote the Belgian detective Hercule Poirot, to dispute and heap their own abuse on Chait’s gross distortion of our philosophy.

“I think there are a lot of dangers to liberty in Donald Trump’s presidency,” Cato Institute Executive Vice President David Boaz told me, while also indicating his annoyance with the headline of Chait’s screed, “The idea that Trump is some sort of manifestation of libertarianism, I just think is poorly founded.”

The rest can be read here.

 

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Source: Taylor Millard

Donald Trump is not a libertarian

The “saviors” of the GOP are not named Romney or Trump

My latest at Hot Air takes a look at Mitt Romney’s possible, and expected, entrance into the Utah Senate race, and the fact he and Donald Trump agree on a stuff a lot. Here’s a brief preview:

There’s a reason why Romney and Trump would probably work pretty well together…they actually agree on a lot of stuff. Yes, yes, Romney was one of the poster boys for parts of #NeverTrump, even if that placard of Romney and the horse wasn’t plastered all over my #NeverTrump apartment in 2016 (I went with Gary Johnson), but the ire could be more along the lines of character, with the occasional policy squabble. After all, Romney did push for American involvement in Syria in 2012, a plan Trump supported, even if the video of said endorsement mysteriously disappeared from Trump’s YouTube page sometime last year. Trump and Romney have similar views on immigration and China, something Romney fan Ross Douthat admitted in NYT by writing the ex-governor was more of a “restrained version of Trump’s nationalistic pitch.” Reason’s Matt Welch made a key point by reminding people Romney was able to push back against GOP primary opponents like Rudy Giuliani and Rick Perry, by harping on their apparent softness on immigration. Both Trump and Romney are in favor of increased military spending, with Trump’s 2016 plan quite similar to Romney’s 2012 plan.

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Source: Taylor Millard

The “saviors” of the GOP are not named Romney or Trump